Be sure you use the proper cover letter format to make your cover letter readable and professional.

Team Leader Cover Letter Template (Text Format)

Today’s Date

Contact Person’s Name
Company Name
Company Address
Town
Post Code
Contact Person’s Number

Dear [Mr/Ms/Mx] [Contact Person’s Name],

As a results-driven team leader with 5 years of experience directing customer service operations in call centres, I’m confident that I’ll make a meaningful impact at [Company Name] as your next Team Leader.

Across my career, I have a proven history of operational excellence. I’ve been praised for consistently exceeding targets, motivating team members, and optimising workflow efficiency. In my current capacity, I lead a team of 50 representatives and have built a thriving work culture that values productivity and has an exceptional customer service record.

Please consider a few of my proudest achievements:

  • Enhanced call centre productivity by 47% by introducing new workflows and online customer service tools
  • Secured new corporate customers, which boosted company revenue by £25K+
  • Awarded ‘Top Team Leader’ in 2020 and 2021 for exceptional leadership skills and innovative management approaches

Now I’m excited to offer my expertise to [Company Name] and inspire your teams to achieve new successes. Please feel free to contact me on 07325 664 890 or at your.email@gmail.com to arrange an interview.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Yours sincerely,

Your Name


How to write your team leader cover letter

Before you begin writing, make sure you know how to write a cover letter in a way that makes you seem like the best candidate for the job.

A team leader is responsible for the overall productivity of a team and ensuring that all tasks are completed efficiently. Excellent team leaders are required to motivate their team members daily and foster a collaborative environment. Additionally, team leaders must communicate effectively with other members of the organisation, manage deadlines, and solve problems.

Here are three tips for writing a team leader cover letter that convinces employers to interview (and then hire) you:

1. Address the recruiter by name

One of the most important parts of making your team leader job application is knowing how to address a cover letter. The cover letter salutation is your chance to greet the recruiter by name, which shows you’ve taken the time to research the company and that you’re genuinely interested in the position.

In most cases, avoid starting your cover letter with generic greetings like ‘Dear Sir or Madam’ or ‘To Whom It May Concern’ because they’re impersonal and won’t help you make a good impression.

The job listing should include the name of the person who reviews applications. But if it doesn’t, try searching on the company website or reaching out to someone at the company directly. Once you have the contact person’s name, start your cover letter like this:

Dear [Recruiter’s Name],

Including the recruiter’s name in your cover letter is a simple but impactful way to show that you’re a top candidate for the team leader role you want. But if you can’t find a contact name, you can still show your attention to detail by addressing the company or department you’re applying to, like so:

Dear Lidl Warehouse Operations Team,

2. Write a strong opening paragraph for your team leader cover letter

Your cover letter is your chance to make a first impression on the recruiter, so make it attention-grabbing and specific to the team leader role you’re applying for. Here’s how to start your cover letter in a way that gets the reader interested in you:

  • First, look at the job posting and identify the role’s key skills
  • Then, in your opening paragraph, briefly describe how your skills match what the employer needs

For example, if the team leader job advert emphasises customer service experience, your cover letter’s first sentence might say:

As a team leader with 5 years of experience in both in-person and call centre customer service environments, I’m perfect for H-Tek’s open Team Leader job.

In addition to showcasing your qualifications, your opening paragraph should also be engaging. Recruiters receive many cover letters, so you need to make yours stand out from the rest. One way to write a compelling opening statement is to tell a brief (but interesting) story about a time when you demonstrated outstanding team leadership skills. A descriptive statement with direct examples will show what kind of team leader you are and why the employer should hire you.

3. Emphasise your team leadership achievements with hard numbers

A well-written team leader cover letter focuses on achievements rather than responsibilities. Highlighting what you’ve done well is essential because employers want to see what you’ve accomplished in previous leadership roles and how those accomplishments can translate into success in the team leader role you’re applying for.

To emphasise your achievements, identify any instances in your career when you excelled as a leader. Once you’ve identified these achievements, showcase them in your cover letter.

For each achievement, try to quantify the results with hard numbers so the employer can see the impact of your leadership. For example, if you helped increase team productivity by 10%, mention that in your team leader cover letter.

You should add data to your team leader CV as well — and it’s easy to do if you use an online CV maker that takes care of the writing and formatting for you.

This is an example of a bulleted list with quantified results from a cover letter written for team leader work:

A screenshot of a team leader cover letter's bulleted list that highlights the applicant's achievements with hard numbers
Including bullets can help you make a short cover letter for a team leader role.

 

Pair your cover letter with an effective team leader CV — that’s how employers expect to see applications.


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Written by

Aaron Case

Aaron Case is a CPRW & Senior Staff Writer at CV Genius with 8+ years of experience in writing and career resource spaces. Job seekers around the world and in various stages of their vocational journeys have landed fulfilling work thanks to his thoughtful career advice, which has also been showcased in publications like Forbes, MSN, CareerAddict, Ladders, Best Colleges, Ivy Exec, Capitalism.com, and vidIQ. Aaron has a BS in English & Communications from Liberty University bolstered by a professional credential from UC Berkeley. He’s collected practical experience while following various career paths, and he enjoys sharing the resulting insights with everyone. You can contact him through his LinkedIn profile or on Twitter. Please note, we don’t accept guest posts, and all such requests will be ignored.